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I just got the Prokera procedure done yesterday...

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Minni View Post
    I also think Prokera sounds wonderful - now if only there were something as permanent for blocked meiobians!

    Also wondering how Prokera compares side-by-side with results of:
    (1) FreshKote consistently applied
    (2) RefreshPlus ditto
    (3) HyloGel ditto

    This last Q may be silly, like comparing apples & oranges I suppose...
    Minnie, have you tried probing? My glands were all blocked too, I've had it done twice and it has been immensely helpful. As far as the drops go your right it is like comparing apples to oranges but I think a few other members here have reported about amniotic drops that are being developed, which hopefully would give similar results of a transplant.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Phillips55 View Post
      Minnie, have you tried probing? My glands were all blocked too, I've had it done twice and it has been immensely helpful. As far as the drops go your right it is like comparing apples to oranges but I think a few other members here have reported about amniotic drops that are being developed, which hopefully would give similar results of a transplant.
      Hi, Phillips, no I haven't tried probing, though it sounded intriguing to me - yet at the same time sorta radical for someone with ultrasensitive eyes like mine, and frankly, I've reached such a point of weariness in my life from endless endless terrorpies/ists tried (including lots IV chelation at a fancy-delancy clinic) - that I'm not about to travel to Florida, nor wish to spend so much money for something "sorta" radical plus no guarantee's of permanency. For me, it's basically a matter of weighing pro's & cons in the balance.

      So then I got to reading testimonies about Mibiflow & that too sounds intriguing,
      ...as does your comment about amniotic drops (more so than Prokera!

      I don't suppose you saw my latest question geared to people with both sensitive and dry eyes? (with the former worse than the latter). My question was - which to try first, Freshkote, Prokera or Mibiflow:

      http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/showt...okera-Mibiflow

      So... does this amniotic development render my above-linked question irrelevant?
      CHEERIO! HELIO! Dry Eye Minni

      sigpic

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      • #33
        I know this thread is a year old already, but Phillip if you see this, can you please let us know who your doctor is that did the Prokera and gave you relief? I am very glad you got relief. If anyone else knows, can you please let us know? Also, any news on any amniotic drops being developed? Thank you.

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        • #34
          http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/forum...e-regenerating

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Betsy View Post
            I know this thread is a year old already, but Phillip if you see this, can you please let us know who your doctor is that did the Prokera and gave you relief? I am very glad you got relief. If anyone else knows, can you please let us know? Also, any news on any amniotic drops being developed? Thank you.
            The first one was done by Dr. Mack in Chicago, the second by my own eye doctor in Wisconsin. Any doctor can order it from the manufacturer, its basically a big hard contact so it took about 5 seconds to put in. After 7 days I just slid it out like a normal contact user would.

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            • #36
              Long shot,but could these be sent to the UK? Or does any one know of it being done here? This is such an uplifting story, thanks for enlightening me I had not heard of this previously.
              People have recovered, so can we.
              www.twitter.com/EyeGirlfriend)

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              • #37
                Thanks Phillip. I wasn't sure if this is something that takes time to make comfortable and exactly right or not so much since it's just temporary? I don't know if anyone local does Prokera and other type similar lenses but I will ask. I saw that a few places offer sclerals which wasn't the case before. Phillip, have you worn sclerals? Also, are the effects of Prokera temporary or longer lasting? May I ask how your routine changed post Prokera?

                I worry about comfort level with prokera type lenses because years ago I wore soft contacts and the idea of hard and gas perm lenses scared me a bit. My eyes are so sensitive now that I don't think they could handle it, especially the sclerals since their long term contact. Though the idea of constantly bathing my eyes in moisture makes me really want them so badly.

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                • #38
                  http://www.biotissue.com/products/prokera.aspx
                  This is the company that makes it, Im sure you can contact them and see if they'll ship outside the us.
                  For people that care, I am in no way affiliated with this company.

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                  • #39
                    Betsy,
                    They arent that bad when your laying down with your eyes closed or sleeping but other than that it was a huge ordeal to get through 7 days. Everyones eyes are different they may not be as uncomfortable for other people but the important thing is be prepared to have them in until they disolve, the worst ting you can do is take them out after you paid for the procedure. Thats why I think traditional amt would be the way to go for people who have access to it because its sutured to the eye which removes the need for the hard contact that keeps it in place. its the hard contact that makes it painful. For people who dont have access to surgical amt prokera is very convenient and less expensive but prepare to basically lay in bed for a week with you eyes closed.

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                    • #40
                      Hi, all.

                      Those in the US who may be interested in being treated with Prokera, I just learned that Biotissue has obtained an insurance code for the device, and it is now covered by insurance!! This is a huge deal, as it is very costly ($1000-1700 per lens). I was treated with it about 8 years ago for a recurrent corneal erosion. Prokera healed it in less than 1 week, after several months of other treaments (drops, ointments, shutting the lids, etc.) failed. So, I am very familiar with it's efficacy. What probably happened to Phillips55 is that Prokera reduced the inflammation in his eyes, which reduced the dry eye and other symptoms presented by inflammation. I would contact your doctors to see if you would benefit from Prokera. It was my optometrist who fitted my scleral lenses who informed me about the insurance coverage for Prokera. I would also call your insurance company to make sure they offer coverage. I called mine, and was told that it is covered 100% minus a nominal deductible.

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                      • #41
                        Hi Phillip, I am also in Wisconsin (Milwaukee to be specific) and curious if you could message me regarding which doctor you saw for Prokera. The optometrist I see for my dry eye doesn't do the procedure, and is with the Froedtert system, who he says rarely uses Prokera because it is so hard to order and bill for so he doesn't really have anyone to recommend me to for the procedure. The reason i am looking to have Prokera done is that I have had dry eyes for the last six years or so (I am 35 years old), and just recently underwent an ICL procedure that went very poorly. A week after implantation of the lenses, I had an acute glaucoma attack and had to make an emergency trip to the doctor's office where they made several incisions in my cornea to release the pressure. Six weeks later, because of other complications, including poor fit, I had to have the ICLs removed. So all in all, after implantation, removal and several extra incisions due to the pressure spike, my corneas are in rough shape and I am having dry eye symptoms like never before. I know it has been a few months since you replied to this board, but if you get this message and are able to point me in the direction of a doctor who is already familiar with using Prokera for post-refractive surgery dry eye, it would be a big help! Thank you!

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                        • #42
                          karlyrae23,

                          Hi I had the first eye done by Dr. Robert Mack in Chicago, the second one was done in Green Bay by my own Opthamologist. He had never done it before but the procedure is so easy it's practically just like slipping a large contact in place. I am pretty sure you could convince a local opthamologist to do it, all my doctor had to do was order one from Biotissue and it arrived in 2 days. I believe they are located in Chicago. Both Doctors prescribed an antibiotic drop to put in each eye once daily. The extremely hard part is keeping them in for 7 days. Not fun but totally worth it in the end. It was also covered by insurance. If I ever have done again I may have the amniotic membrane sewn into place, which is much more comfortable, but however it's administered I am now a huge believer in stem cell therapy for certain eye conditions.

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