Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Autologous Serum Drops

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Autologous Serum Drops

    Looking for other's experiences. I've been on the drops for going on 5 months now. They are not lubricating but ARE good for inflammation and healing. I started out with 50% and now 75% and don't see a difference. The higher the percentage, the less quantity of drops rec'd and the more frequent needing refills. What have others found to be beneficial? Is there a marked difference in the 100% drops. How often do long time users put them in?

  • #2
    I use them. They are very helpful. It really helps to use other therapies in conjunction like hot compresses. I've documented the therapies I use at my website with some humor, videos, and harmonica at www.lasikdryeyeblues.com. Please note I'm not soliciting any kind of donations (my friend told me to add a button, but I don't want any dry eye sufferers donating to me).
    Thanks
    Matthew

    Comment


    • #3
      I use 35%. I have been using Systane Nightime ointment during the day as well and thinning it out with the drops.

      Comment


      • #4
        Autologous eye serum drops really are most beneficial for keeping the cornea healthy. That is a huge concern for dry eye sufferers and since I have been on them 4+ years I have never once had a Dr tell me I have dry spots on my corneas and almost every time before that I always had dry spots. I use 50% and that seems to do the trick and I have no intention of upping it. For sure they do not really lubricate and I can't say that my eyes bother me any less but it is worth a lot to know that my corneas are healthy and I am less at risk of losing eyesight over this.

        What I have discovered though is that if you live in Canada and have Blue Cross coverage, at least as a senior those drops are in fact covered 80% which has been very helpful....F/G

        Comment


        • #5
          How much do they cost and how long does it take to see if they work for you?

          Comment


          • #6
            After using 100% autologous serum ( 4X every day) earlier this spring, I felt worse than I did before the serum. Now I'm using 50% (6 X per day) but still experience headaches and feeling of tension at the back of my eyes. What might I be doing wrong? Thanks for any thoughts on this ....

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm on 75% and I put them in as needed, when I'm at home. I usually don't carry them with me when I'm running around. The more I use, the less inflammed and whiter my eyes look. They also feel a lot better, probably because of less inflammation. My original doctor told me to use them once an hour, at least, when I started at 50%.

              Here's an old thread on %: http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/forum...rs/16226-serum
              Last edited by PotatoCakes; 21-Dec-2016, 10:58. Reason: add link

              Comment


              • #8
                I use them in the AM and PM. In Canada they are about $230 for a 4-5 month supply. I know that they say they last up to 3 months in the freezer but I don't use mine up in that time frame but they still seem to work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Gerri: Unless I am mistaken, I am guessing that the serum drops have nothing to do with your headache and feeling of tension. Here is a quote from a study explaining how serum drops work.

                  "Biological Tear Substitutes Naturally occurring biological, ie, nonpharmaceutical fluids, can be used to substitute for natural tears. The use of serum or saliva for this purpose has been reported in humans. They are usually unpreserved. When of autologous origin, they lack antigenicity and contain various epitheliotrophic factors, such as growth factors, neurotrophins, vitamins, immunoglobulins, and extracellular matrix proteins involved in ocular surface maintenance. Biological tear substitutes maintain the morphology and support the proliferation of primary human corneal epithelial cells better than pharmaceutical tear substitutes. However, despite biomechanical and biochemical similarities, relevant compositional differences compared with normal tears exist and are of clinical relevance. Additional practical problems concern sterility and stability, and a labor-intensive production process."

                  This explains why many serum drop users experience significant improvement in overall eye health. Typically the carrier liquid is 0.9% non preserved saline. They are intended more to heal the eye than to lubricate it and so, at least in my case, I have found that they are not a lubrication substitute.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn't do much forbid unfortunately...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've had two different doctors prescribe them for me, both at 20% concentration.

                      I found that they work tremendously well for me. They helped reduce the grittiness in my eyes to virtually zero. My doctor told me to take them about 8 times a day, but I actually take them between about 12-14 times a day.

                      Only problem is that insurance doesn't really cover them. However, recently I talked to my insurance company and they said someone had successfully appealed by having their doctor write up an explanation of why they are medically necessary.
                      What you need to know about computer-induced dry eye
                      Dry Eye Survey
                      IPL Doctors
                      Probing Doctors

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have been on 40% for almost 3 weeks, and they made a world of difference. At its worst, in addition to my eyes being dry and sore, I could not keep my eyelids open for even 1 second - they drop close as soon as I struggle to open them! It was awful, rendering me unable to function, and also unacceptable socially and at work. The ophthamologist could not give a definitive diagnosis even after 1.5 months, and just gave me a list of 10 prescription and OTC products to try... referring me to more lab tests (blood, MRI etc.) and other specialists (rhumatologist, neurologist, dermatologist).. I am still struggling through this process.

                        From what I read so far, it is possibly some inflammation that is affecting my levator muscles from opening my lids.

                        The serum drops was the turning point when I see an improvement of this strange eyelid condition (and dryness). I still need steroid drops (Durezol, 2-3xd/day) together with the serum drops, which I use up to once every half hour, when I am at the office with dry and irritating air. At home I need less.

                        This is in addition to many other lifestyle changes - humidifiers, safety goggles with some blue light blocking, supplements.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Also, I am excited reading the posts about sclera lens, and the possiblity of using the serum drops in combination with them - currently I am experimenting with how to keep moisture in after applying the serum drops - I am wearing DIY moisture chamber goggles by sticking wet cotton pads on each side of the safety goggles I got from Home Depot. It sounds like the sclera lens would be a much more elegant solution for this purpose. So, on my to do list is to hunt down where to get these in Canada where I am.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi ltree: I don't know what province you are in in Canada but FYI my Alberta Blue Cross paid for my serum drops 80%. It was a big help.The pharmacist gave me a form which I filled out and submitted and voila! I got a cheque in the mail. I am happy that the drops are helping you with this very strange condition....F/G

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I used 100% serum drops 4 times daily for several years - I found them more effective than the 50% ones. I wouldn't have quit, except we took off to travel full-time and it wasn't practical to bring them with us. The cost was cheap for a 3 month supply - about $25 to the lab for drawing the blood, and about $75 to the pharmacy for bottling the serum (all this is Canadian dollars). I stored them in the freezer, and only kept the bottle currently in use thawed in the fridge - I asked for small 3ml bottles that lasted a few days each.

                              (P.S. I'm not around the forums often anymore, so if anyone reading this has followup questions, I may not see if for weeks - so sorry! Anyhow, I've posted a lot on here, so if you do a search for my username and serum drops you'll find what I know hehe)
                              Yet another post-Lasik (2005)...
                              Anyone have a time machine so I can go back and undo this mess?

                              Comment

                              Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
                              Auto-Saved
                              Smile :) Biggrin :D Wink ;) Rolleyes :rolleyes: Tongue :p Cool :cool: Redface :o Confused :confused: Eek :eek: Frown :( Mad :mad:
                              x
                              Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
                              x

                              Unconfigured PHP Module

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X

                              Debug Information