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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by diydry View Post
    Sorry I hijacked your thread. Sometimes I look at the last post without seeing the original topic which happens a lot on my mobile device. I just wanted to chime in and say it sounds like a good trip. Definitely positivity in your post. Your attitude towards disability is healthy I think, to have no excuses (except where there are actual, I-just-canít-do-it physical limitations, which happens sometimes). My therapist says the same thing. All easier said than done of course, sometimes the mind game of having dry eye is overwhelming even when physically we are seeing real improvements. Was there anything on the trip you might have done differently if you had no dry eye? It sounds like you really did it all or 90% of it. Edit: I know the wind was super tough but did that hold you much from doing the things you wanted out of curiosity?
    Yeah, in all honesty, I did about 60% of what I wanted to do. I couldn't walk the strip. I couldn't stay at the aria because they don't have microwaves. I didn't go out to eat as much as I'd like. Most buildings, the smoke and/or the wind destroyed my eyes. I will need sclerals to do stuff like that. In the room, in the car, going from place to place, no issue. The plane didn't dry me at all, which I found odd.

    I am positive about it, but I am limited quite a bit and it sucks. I just need to find a way around the problem. I'm going to see a specialist in Chicago the 25th, he does prose there. If he recommends them, I'll go to Boston and look at all my options..get fitted by someone who does this a lot.

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  • edmunder
    replied
    I actually wear ski goggles around town sometimes with a big panama hat. And you know what. Ive found people have better things to do than care about how silly i look. They arent that much bigger than my grandmas huge wrap around sunglasses. I need to walk the dog and i want perfect wind and air resistance. I think its best to really find good moisture chamber solutions.

    Either speedo swim mask. Which are bigger than goggles. Or 7eye or WileyX and pull thrm super tight - but ghey fog on me. So ski mask and speedo swim mask goggles are both antifog

    https://www.amazon.com/Speedo-Charge...ef=mp_s_a_1_12

    here is the speedo swim mask goggles. They are bigger and rest on the top of the cheeks.

    Its easy to find cheap anti fog ski goggles. In dark lenses or i even have yellow lenses.

    Leave a comment:


  • diydry
    replied
    Sorry I hijacked your thread. Sometimes I look at the last post without seeing the original topic which happens a lot on my mobile device. I just wanted to chime in and say it sounds like a good trip. Definitely positivity in your post. Your attitude towards disability is healthy I think, to have no excuses (except where there are actual, I-just-canít-do-it physical limitations, which happens sometimes). My therapist says the same thing. All easier said than done of course, sometimes the mind game of having dry eye is overwhelming even when physically we are seeing real improvements. Was there anything on the trip you might have done differently if you had no dry eye? It sounds like you really did it all or 90% of it. Edit: I know the wind was super tough but did that hold you much from doing the things you wanted out of curiosity?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    So I don't know how to feel about this trip...I guess because I'm so new to this dry eye problem...was this a success? Was it a failure? I guess I should list the good and the bad.

    The good followed by the bad.....I got to see an old friend. We laughed and had a pretty good time. I also cried, which wasn't bad, he just wanted to help. Everyone that loves me wants to help and they feel hopeless because they can't. I was sad a lot on the trip though which I'll explain.

    I got a vacation. It was nice to get away. It was also hard to be away from my wife and daughter.

    I got to go out and have a few good meals. However, I was sad that I had a couple times I just couldn't handle the wind. That was mentally tough.

    If if I were to do it over again, I'd do it again. It wasn't perfect....matter of fact, it really showed me how limited I am now. The statement, life isn't fair, has never cut so close to the bone.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by diydry View Post
    No, I haven't looked into hybrids. Is that like Dallies? I've heard some folks with dry eye use that, but I would think it would just make my eye dryer if my cornea is not bathed in fluid. I'm not clear who it is indicated for. I will ask my optometrist though, thanks.
    Hybrids are soft contacts on the sclera, but the vaulted part over the cornea is gas permeable. I just thought it may be more comfortable to have a soft material on the scleral...but I never see anyone wear them.

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  • diydry
    replied
    No, I haven't looked into hybrids. Is that like Dallies? I've heard some folks with dry eye use that, but I would think it would just make my eye dryer if my cornea is not bathed in fluid. I'm not clear who it is indicated for. I will ask my optometrist though, thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • hopeful_hiker
    replied
    Great to hear about improvements, always. Hope you keep having more and more good days! And same goes for the rest of us.

    Leave a comment:


  • farmgirl
    replied
    Originally posted by Dowork123 View Post

    Im going to be honest, today was rough. The wind and the smoke was harsh on my eyes, but I pushed through. I think this reinforced the fact that I need sclerals to function in difficult environments. At home, or even in the hotel room, I'm pretty normal. But once I hit that nasty air, it starts going downhill.
    You mentioned smoke and wind, that is a deadly combination (speaking from experience) and here is why...

    Exposure to smoke on any level can cause irritation to your eyesósymptoms such as burning sensations, redness, and tearing up are commonplace with exposure to smoke. Robert N. Weinreb MD, a distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of California San Diego, claims that ďeven a healthy personís eyes can be botheredĒ when it comes to smoke exposure and, particularly in the case of those with dry eye syndrome, ďexacerbate symptoms.Ē

    What causes this irritation is the existence of small particles, which are two and one half microns or less in size (for reference: 25,400 microns = 1 inch), within the smoke that get stuck in your eyes. These particles are too small to be seen with the naked eye. These particles can remain floating in the air long after the smoke has cleared, so if you are around fire or a place where large amounts of fire have been recently, many firefighters recommend the use of protective eyewear.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by diydry View Post
    Itís true, even before reading this thread I do feel like I blink less when using my sclerals, and I feel like my blinks are less complete as well due to the large prosthetic in my eye. However this is very subjective and I havenít read or heard about any risks of worse MGD from lens use. I would like to think that with proper lid hygiene and blinking exercises (without sclerals) any theoretical risks of MGD from scleral use can be avoided. I think in the literature the risks from scleral lens appear to be corneal neovascularization and non-mgd stuff. Either way, my philosophy so far (as a relative newcomer to scleral lenses) is to only wear them when I need them and not simply to insert them out of habit, in case there are unknown risks.
    Did you ever look into hybrids? I'm curious why I don't see more people trying them...but there's gotta be a reason. I wonder if hybrids would cut down on some of the side effects of the gas permeable lens.

    Leave a comment:


  • diydry
    replied
    Itís true, even before reading this thread I do feel like I blink less when using my sclerals, and I feel like my blinks are less complete as well due to the large prosthetic in my eye. However this is very subjective and I havenít read or heard about any risks of worse MGD from lens use. I would like to think that with proper lid hygiene and blinking exercises (without sclerals) any theoretical risks of MGD from scleral use can be avoided. I think in the literature the risks from scleral lens appear to be corneal neovascularization and non-mgd stuff. Either way, my philosophy so far (as a relative newcomer to scleral lenses) is to only wear them when I need them and not simply to insert them out of habit, in case there are unknown risks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Hokucat View Post
    MGD1701 , thatís interesting about possibly not blinking as much when having sclerals continuously bathing the eyes. Iíve been in the habit of doing blinking exercises regularly, so donít think my glands have been further compromised by sclerals. But something for scleral users to be aware of. It would be telling to have a LipiView or something to monitor the blink rate or partial blinks before and after sclerals.
    This was actually one of my fears about sclerals...would it make my MGD worse? Would I have incomplete blinks because of the hard prosthetic? I guess that's why I looked at it as a last resort, because I feel like putting anything in my eye complicates things. However, I have to give them a shot. I appreciate you always coming in my threads and speaking up about it, makes me realize it's a possible option I really need to look into. Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • edmunder
    replied
    Dowork123 sorry you are having some trouble with the smoke there. Im a bit worried about winter coming here in MI. I can put on a bunch of humidifiers and turn off the heating vents in and around my bedroom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hokucat
    replied
    MGD1701 , thatís interesting about possibly not blinking as much when having sclerals continuously bathing the eyes. Iíve been in the habit of doing blinking exercises regularly, so donít think my glands have been further compromised by sclerals. But something for scleral users to be aware of. It would be telling to have a LipiView or something to monitor the blink rate or partial blinks before and after sclerals.

    Leave a comment:


  • MGD1701
    replied
    Hi Hokucat

    Scleral Lens
    Wondering if we will forget to blink when we have such lens on?

    I have heard some doctors, including prof./Dr. Sheri Rowen
    say contact lens wearers often forget to blink as they offer comfort. In fact, I really saw a young guy only blinks once per minute when he read a magazine. Woo, how could it be possible! Well, I reminded him how important to blink, he said he has lens on.
    Last edited by MGD1701; 18-Jul-2018, 16:51.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hokucat
    replied
    Yes, it helps to wear moisture chambers on the plane and use a thicker gel drop, to have a double barrier against the dry airplane air. Even better if you can close your eyes most of the flight. When I was in Vegas during my moderate-to-severe dry eye years, I actuallly had to do the moisture goggles and gel drops the entire time while I was there, because of all the air conditioning, smoke, and outside dry heat and bright sun.

    To me, getting sclerals was one of the best things I ever did to provide more comfort in these types of conditions, and just daily functioning in general. In fact, last month I was at an outdoor graduation for several hours where it was very windy and sunny, and I forgot my sunglasses, but was fine with just my sclerals. My mom who also has dry eyes was wearing her wrap around sunglasses, and was amazed I was fine. Of course I am better than I was, but definitely still have dry eyes. I know many people say sclerals is one of the last resorts, but if you can get a good fit and tolerate these lenses, you may not even be aware youíre wearing them, similar to regular contacts. Plus they help my eyes feel better on days when Iím wearing glasses instead, likely the result of the sclerals protecting and moisturizing my eyes the days prior.

    BTW, I started on serum tears again a few months ago to try to get further improvements. Right before I put my sclerals on, I put a drop in each of my eyes. Then I include a few drops in the lens bowl along with the PF saline and a couple drops of PF artificial tears, and insert them. When I saw I my PROSE scleral specialist a few weeks ago, I told her I was doing this, and she said that was fine, and said actually the surface of my eyes looked better than last time. So this may help you as well.

    Am glad you are able to make the trip, just being able to do that is something to celebrate. Enjoy the rest of your trip with your friend, and all the buffets in Vegas!

    Leave a comment:

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