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Lacrymal Gland Disfunction - Cures?

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  • Lacrymal Gland Disfunction - Cures?

    Hi all,

    Maybe this has been posted before.....just thought I'd share what I found.

    Clinical tests on rats whereby lacrymal gland tissue was transplanted proved that tearing was indeed increased. Article is dated Feb. 2007

    http://www.ima.org.il/imaj/ar07feb-8.pdf

    This future looks good perhaps?

    Ian.

  • #2
    Good find,

    but says 'It could be a treatment option only for severly suffering patients such as post radiation lacrimal damage' so people who have lacrimal gland damage/atrophy.
    I healed my dry eye with nutrition and detoxification. I'm now a Nutritional Therapist at: www.nourishbalanceheal.com . Join my dry eye facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/420821978111328/

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    • #3
      i get so f....ing angry when i have to read that only people with severe dry eyes get a treatment!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! what about those f.....ing women who consider their breasts too small and get an OP...is that fair?????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????? i just dont see the point!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Alexandra
        i get so... angry when i have to read that only people with severe dry eyes get a treatment!
        I think you need to read the full context in order to be fair here. The study is talking about early stage feasibility studies on rats with a treatment for which at present they believe only has potential to help certain types of cases. If I understood correctly, the point about severity was not in order to exclude people with moderate conditions, but to identify causes for which transplantation might, or might not, be relevant.

        The results are suggestive, but heaven knows how many years they may be from clinical application.

        Obviously, the indications for this invasive
        procedure of lacrimal gland transplantation are limited. It would
        most likely not be effective in cicatricial diseases where the lacrimal
        ductules have been scarred, or when the new gland is likely
        to be involved in the disease process that caused the damage
        or dysfunction of the patient's own gland (e.g., systemic immune
        conditions such as Sjogren's syndrome and graft versus host
        disease). It could be a treatment option only for severely suffering
        patients such as in post-radiation lacrimal gland damage.
        Rebecca Petris
        The Dry Eye Foundation
        dryeyefoundation.org
        800-484-0244

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        • #5
          hi rebecca,
          thanx for explaing. probably this is all too complicated for people without a degree in medicine ..... :-)

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