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  • waterbee
    replied
    Vitamin D and dry eye (study link here) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27660921
    do keep in touch

    Leave a comment:


  • hipokrytus
    replied
    Hi,
    I was tested negative for lyme disease, but yes, Iíll redo the test, but I want to be done with some others first. So far Iíve determined that: my thyroid seems fine, testosterone level is also fine, I have mild vitamin D deficiency and I was tested positive for increased Candida antibodies. Iím starting the anti-candida diet, but Iím far from assuming candida is definitely the answer. What test did you get to learn about active mono?

    Leave a comment:


  • waterbee
    replied
    Glad your getting those tests done any update?
    I just found out i have active mono and going to try some antivirals as ive read some success stories regarding it (and even a medical paper about a kid with chronic dry eye 100% recovering)
    not sure if you've had it done yet either but - its wise to read up on lyme blood tests too , they often have a high false negative result so choose a lab with a good reputation for testing. mine was negative on the NHS in england ( a free test) but positive in a private test in germany and USA, i had some success with my eyes after treatment, but its still work in progress. the pain i had chronically reduced by 80% within 3 weeks of treatment and has not returned , though they are still dry, its a great start.

    Leave a comment:


  • hipokrytus
    replied
    Good thoughts. I've been eating pumpkin seeds for zink and carrots+dried apricots for vitamin A, but maybe it's not enough. I am having my blood tested for lyme disease, candida antibodies, and checking some hormone levels. I will then check for deficiencies.

    Thanks for reminding me about EBV. Two years ago it was suspected I had or had had mononucleosis. I think my IgG VCA was high. I asked one of my eye doctors about it, but he said I should abandon the idea. I'll think about this again.

    Leave a comment:


  • waterbee
    replied
    first thing i thought of when i read your post was a ZINC deficiency (which also effects hormones, especially in males) its worth picking some up and giving it ago. Im not saying it could cause dry eye alone but it would affect your eyes health as most of the eye ball is made up of that.
    Personally i would never give up looking for the answers, ive spent most of the last year researching and tweeting (feel free to follow me everyone, my twitter name is on my profile) about causes of dry eye and yes there are 100s, but guess what, you only need to find that one and it becomes manageable.
    There are so many things to look into, there are viruses that effect the eyes and can be treated and wont show as anything without tests (blood tests for active EBV for instance) there are vitamin deficiencies that play havoc with dry eye - Vitamin A (some people cannot absorb vitamin A in veg format/or meat format, you can do tests for these, and those need supplements) or you can have something more unusual like Lyme diseases that cause eye pain, and again is not a test most people think to do. There's allergies, (mould issues, pollen issues) there's inflammation caused by gluten, wow the list goes on and on.
    Keep searching and taking care of yourself. we are all work in progress but we have to do the work ourselves. never belive a medical professional when they tell you, you are helpless, there is always research to be done and new things to try.

    Leave a comment:


  • hipokrytus
    replied
    Thanks for your reply. Yes, I've noticed there is a lot of randomness involved in finding the right people, with the right knowledge and the right experience.

    So far, it seems to me that the eye doctors are not the kind of doctors to visit if one wants to find the cause of dry eyes. Having visited some of them, I was put under the impression that it is just a thing people have, and all one can do is to take artificial tears. It is when the problem got worse that I realized I had to look for answers myself.

    I'm from eastern Europe, by the way, and that doesn't exactly increase my chances of finding quality doctors. I will continue my search, but I feel it must involve visiting other sorts of doctors as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • woodart
    replied
    Finding a good eye doc is difficult unless you are lucky. I have over 50 years experience at docs and dry eyes. Even some with a reputation are useless. Just don't stop trying new docs until you find one or hopefully two. I have two decent ones finally but I still will keep looking. Sometimes I think we need to find a doc who has dry eyes so it will be understood how bad it is. BTW, Optimel is the drops with the Manuka Honey in it. Only one who makes it. They sell through ebay so depending on where you are it can be purchased. My sister claims it helped her but the eye doc didn't notice any difference when I went. Stings like crazy. My biggest help was flaxseed oil more than anything for me. Don't know why. It's still not 100% but my eyes are at least tolerable now for the last 15 or so years. I didn't have any luck with the duct plugs but the first ones they try on you dissolve so it gives you a chance to try them. I do not hesitate changing or trying new eye docs. I am trying a new one after the first of the year I heard about. I don't know how much a doc gets training on about dry eye in school. I know one fo the good ones I have has students there learning so maybe we will get more experts in time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Klee
    replied
    Originally posted by hipokrytus View Post
    I’ve seen 8 eye doctor since my dry eyes started 3 years ago (I’m a 31-year old male). The problem has progressed and has made me wonder how bad it can still get.

    7 out of those doctors were like: “you know, some people just have it, it could be caused by a hundred of different things, I’m really sorry, here are some drops, goodbye”.
    Perhaps I would be fine with this, but the problem has got worse, and I don’t see what’s stopping it from reaching an even less bearable point.

    My dry eyes is nothing like what I’ve read about it. No reflex tears, no redness, no eye-lid problems. Just sheer desert in the eyes (especially when using a computer). I also have light sensitivity and left-eye pains (I assume the consequences of dry eyes).

    I’ve managed to learn that I don’t have MGD. The worst Schirmer result I’ve had was 5 mm/2 mm.
    Things I’ve tried (and haven’t worked): eye drops/gels (various amounts, types, frequency of use), drinking a lot of water, eye friendly diet, warm compresses, eye-lid hygiene, good humidity, no air-conditioning.

    So I appear to be this aqueous-deficient type, and have been searching for the cause quite by myself. Since I also have Raynaud’s, my idea was Sjogren’s syndrome, but I was quite thoroughly checked in this respect, and nothing was found.

    I’ve read about other potential causes and there haven’t been many whose other symptoms I seem to have. I’ve been considering androgen deficiency on account of low muscularity and body hair. I’m also trying to figure out what causes my seborrheic dermatitis (around the nose, but away from the eye-lids). I asked the eye doctors if it could cause the dryness – no, my eye-lids are fine. But maybe whatever causes the seborrheic dermatitis also causes the dryness.

    I’m still postponing going for things like duct plugs and Restasis. I would much rather find the cause before trying those things.

    Now I want to ask you if there is a point in this search of mine. I mean those doctors are way smarter than me, especially when it comes to the eyes, so I guess they know what they talk about. Maybe it’s just something I just have.
    Youd be surprised how clueless some of them are,ive learned more here and on the internet then 3 doctors so far. Keep doing research,ive told them things they dont know. Xx

    Leave a comment:


  • hipokrytus
    replied
    Thanks for your responses.

    The shortest time I devoted to was warm compresses (1 month) as it seemed to make things worse. I introduced into my diet canned codfish, flaxoil, lots of green things and limited sugar and coffee. It's been two months.

    One of the conclusions Iíve drawn recently is this: if I have aqueous deficient dry eye, It means there is something wrong with my lacrimal glands. Then perhaps instead of visiting another eye doctor I should go to a gland doctor. But why did none of the eye doctors suggest itÖ

    I see that a lot depends on my own investigation, reading about this tear stealing nuisance and about how people managed to conquer it. I will continue to bother doctors and present my ideas to them, until I find someone more inquisitive.

    Good thing Iíve found this Mozilla add-on (Dark background and light text) and the software called flux. This makes computer use I little more bearable.

    If I see any improvement at some point (though the idea of improvement is quite unimaginable), Iíll be sure to post about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMGD
    replied
    Andrewsfam74,

    Do you know what caused your dry eyes?

    What about diet change? Maybe you are allergic to something that you are eating and that could affect your eyes. Sounds silly but it helped some people so its worth a try.

    I know some people say honey is good too for the eyes. Haven't tried it personally, though x

    Leave a comment:


  • andrewsfam74
    replied
    I certainly hear you! My eyes have gotten so bad over a 2 1/2 year period they actually cause physical pain also. The only time my eyes don't hurt also is when they are closed. I have tried so many "remedies" and nothing has worked - Barlean's Fish Oil Swirl, several different "eye" formula supplements prescribed by physicians, doxycycline, Lacricert, contact lenses (not scleral), Restasis, Lotemax, OTC eye drops, warm compresses, goggles, anti-inflammatories for the pain, among other things, and nothing has worked for me either so far; it is just getting worse here too.. There has to be a solution out there somewhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • StopDry
    replied
    Hi. Wish I could be more helpful. All I can say that is that I also have Raynaud's but I do not have Sjogren's, so just like you here.

    You say you have tried many things trying to figure out the cause for the dry eyes.
    Did you try each thing for a prolonged period of time? For example, changing nutrition for just a couple of days is not enough.

    I think my dry eyes appear more when I am under stress. I have more than a year without much issues only to have a Recurrent Corneal Erosion happen again a couple of weeks ago. Which is triggered by dry eyes. The only thing that changed dramatically was that I was under extreme stress for the week prior to my last erosion episode. The other differnece was that I am always taking capacious amounts of Fish Oils and probiotics but have ran out of them 2 weeks priod to that and forgot to buy. So this can also be a contributing factor.

    I am now going to try again capacious amounts of fishoils along with very high dose of probiotics to see if that makes my eyes better. If you get any interesting conclusions yourself, please share them, maybe you have interesting findings.


    Most eye doctors are quite superficial and will no dive deep to detect the source of the problem, so I wouldn't count on them, you would have better chance doing trial and error like you did before.

    Leave a comment:


  • hipokrytus
    started a topic Finding the cause.

    Finding the cause.

    Iíve seen 8 eye doctor since my dry eyes started 3 years ago (Iím a 31-year old male). The problem has progressed and has made me wonder how bad it can still get.

    7 out of those doctors were like: ďyou know, some people just have it, it could be caused by a hundred of different things, Iím really sorry, here are some drops, goodbyeĒ.
    Perhaps I would be fine with this, but the problem has got worse, and I donít see whatís stopping it from reaching an even less bearable point.

    My dry eyes is nothing like what Iíve read about it. No reflex tears, no redness, no eye-lid problems. Just sheer desert in the eyes (especially when using a computer). I also have light sensitivity and left-eye pains (I assume the consequences of dry eyes).

    Iíve managed to learn that I donít have MGD. The worst Schirmer result Iíve had was 5 mm/2 mm.
    Things Iíve tried (and havenít worked): eye drops/gels (various amounts, types, frequency of use), drinking a lot of water, eye friendly diet, warm compresses, eye-lid hygiene, good humidity, no air-conditioning.

    So I appear to be this aqueous-deficient type, and have been searching for the cause quite by myself. Since I also have Raynaudís, my idea was Sjogrenís syndrome, but I was quite thoroughly checked in this respect, and nothing was found.

    Iíve read about other potential causes and there havenít been many whose other symptoms I seem to have. Iíve been considering androgen deficiency on account of low muscularity and body hair. Iím also trying to figure out what causes my seborrheic dermatitis (around the nose, but away from the eye-lids). I asked the eye doctors if it could cause the dryness Ė no, my eye-lids are fine. But maybe whatever causes the seborrheic dermatitis also causes the dryness.

    Iím still postponing going for things like duct plugs and Restasis. I would much rather find the cause before trying those things.

    Now I want to ask you if there is a point in this search of mine. I mean those doctors are way smarter than me, especially when it comes to the eyes, so I guess they know what they talk about. Maybe itís just something I just have.
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