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Which Job/ Career to suit dry eyes?

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  • Which Job/ Career to suit dry eyes?

    Just looking for advice on which jobs/ careers would best suit people with dry eyes, I am unable to do my current job as a result of worsening dry eyes and need an alternative career path unfortunately, and finding something suitable for dry eyes is the #1 priority now otherwise there's no point.. Anyone have a career that suits this condition?

  • #2
    There's a thread on this topic here that might be of interest: http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/showt...-career-etc%29

    In your case, can your eyes handle years of study in college/university to retrain? If so, would you even want to study for years to retrain? (it's not everyone's cup of tea, right?)

    Or do you need a career that would require minimal study since the reading to get a degree in something new would be too hard on your eyes?

    Options that don't require so much study might be something in the trades (ex. construction, electrician, plumber etc.) - I know there will still be some bookwork, but here most of the training is on the job - if it's like that where you live, maybe that could be an option? They make really good money here, don't know what the job situation is like for them where you live mind you...
    Yet another post-Lasik (2005)...
    Anyone have a time machine so I can go back and undo this mess?

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    • #3
      I just quit my job as a school counselor bc my eyes were so unbearable. The low humidity (20.5%) florescent lighting, heating/AC and stress were all too much. I am now trying to figure out what to do. This might sound kinda nuts but I was thinking about online teaching. Its crazy b/c its on the comp but I can control my environment, the stress should be low, and I will totally limit the comp other than work. Oh and I can wear onion googles and not feel like a weird-o. I like Saag's idea about a trade job but I don't think I could do it. I like nannying but there are no benefits or long term job security. Oh and no retirement unless you can save $ on your own.

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      • #4
        Mental health will be covered under Obamacare. If you were a school counselor, maybe you could get your Master's degree in Counseling or Psychology and then get licensed as a LPCC, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor or a Marriage and Family Therapist. You could convert part of your home into a a home office or rent a small office someplace where you can control both your environment and schedule, to accommodate your eyes.

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        • #5
          I do like that idea...and after looking (briefly) into I would still have a lot of classes to take on campus, have an internship, and probably need to be in a clinical setting for a few years before I could open my own practice. I do really like that idea though and will look into it a little more.

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          • #6
            Landscape gardener ~ round here they make more money than people think.
            Paediatric ocular rosacea ~ primum non nocere

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            • #7
              Originally posted by littlemermaid View Post
              Landscape gardener ~ round here they make more money than people think.
              Here too! Only trouble is our winters are so long that it limits the months that they can earn anything from that kind of work. So when the ARE able to work, they can make a lot of money - but over winter, not so much.

              I'd like that kind of job - love digging around in the dirt, planting things, creating something new in the yard etc.
              Yet another post-Lasik (2005)...
              Anyone have a time machine so I can go back and undo this mess?

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              • #8
                Have looked at outdoors type jobs away from computers, but the problem is if it rains or even sweating a lot makes the wraparounds soaked/ fog up.

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                • #9
                  Nothing wrong with a wet gasket I don't think... it will still block the wind, right? I've worn mine soaked all day from wearing them while getting tossed around boogie boarding in the ocean and they still work to block the wind.

                  re: fogging - not much you can do about that other than wave them around periodically to de-fog them. But surely that's not a deal breaker is it? If it really bothers you a ton, maybe go to a snorkel/dive shop and buy some anti-fog spray for your wraparounds. I've done heavy yard work, digging holes, sweating buckets on super hot days and it's workable, and that's without any anti-fog treatment. Do I have to take them off a lot and wave them around to de-fog? Sure. But that's better than sitting inside feeling sorry for myself because I have to wear goggly glasses that fog up. Better to just get out there and DO what I want to do, and do whatever I need to do in order to make that happen.

                  And if rain is the cause of wet gaskets, then wear a baseball cap - the visor will solve that problem perfectly.

                  So to me, these objections can be easily overcome.

                  Now if you simply have no interest in an outdoor-type job, then that's another story entirely. My point is merely that if it an outdoors-type job happens to be something you might enjoy doing, wet gaskets and fogging shouldn't be an insurmountable issue.
                  Yet another post-Lasik (2005)...
                  Anyone have a time machine so I can go back and undo this mess?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Any more suggestions on jobs/ careers? I've found wearing goggles outdoors doesn't really work for me either as they fog up/ the humidity causes more inflammation I think

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